Stating the obvious

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I just crawled through an article on WebMD, intended to help parents guide their ADHD children to develop better study habits. The URL is http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/ss/slideshow-adhd-study-habits?ecd=wnl_day_083015&ctr=wnl-day-083015_nsl-ld-stry&mb=UT0EfRiJlerLe8Nl%2f6BrJGdEpmNqbUHLZTN%2fwNIxCow%3d and I would suggest you might use this to create a cheat sheet for parents. If nothing else, you can pass along the URL.

One screen struck me as especially useful for new teachers. Screen 14 of 15, titled “Mention the Obvious,” can be applied to students in classrooms everywhere.

“When helping your child do her homework, include steps that might seem obvious to you. For instance, the last two steps should always be “put your homework in your folder” and “put your folder in your backpack.” The more specific you are when giving instructions, the better.

Eduhonesty: At the end of the hour, you may assume students will automatically put their homework in places where they will be able to locate it later. That’s a bold assumption. Some students will, but others won’t. It never hurts to say, “Now put that homework in your folder and put your folder in your backpack. Put the folder in a location where you will be able to find it when you get home. Do not forget to take your Fungus book home. You will need that book to do the homework.” If you see those students at the end of the day, check that they did as instructed.

“Is your homework in your backpack in your folder? Along with the fungus book?”

You will never be the worse for giving “extra” instructions. Spelling out all the little details step-by-step will simplify your life.